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Aileen-Dillane

Hello,
I’m Aileen Dillane and I’m a musician, ethnomusicologist,  writer and academic.

Teibí is the Irish word for ‘abstract’ and what you’ll find in these pages is distilled information about my work, research, and performing interests, as well as some other random things. My twitter handle is @aileen_dillane.
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Thanks for visiting

soundscapes-limerick

Urban Soundscapes and Critical Citizenship

I’m part of an interdisciplinary research cluster (founding member) called LimerickSoundscapes. We’re currently made up of ethnomusicologists, urban sociologists, and sound interaction design specialists.   Some of our project work can be found here.  We ran a conference in March 2014 called ‘Urban Soundscapes and Critical Citizenship’.  Publications on this work include the 2015  Journal of Urban Cultural Studies, 2 (1 & 2) special section/edition.  A few more related works are coming out this year (see my publications section). My colleague in MIC, Tony Langlois, and I have been working with students in the National Learning Network and with Men’s Shed on King’s Island on a new tranche of recordings which we hope to upload soon.  We’re also working on developing university modules to help build a support team around this applied project, including this seminar to MA in Sociology students in UL which outlines aspects of the project.

Publications & Presentations

SERIES EDITOR:

Power, Discourse and Society (Rowman & Littlefield)

Popular Musics Matter: Social, Cultural and Political Interventions (Rowman & Littlefield)

PUBLICATIONS: (you can download some of my publications from here)

Books/Edited Collections

  • Dillane, A., Power, M., Haynes, A., Devereux, E., eds. (2018 forthcoming) Songs of Social Protest: International Perspectives. London: Rowman and Littlefield
  • Devereux, E., Power, M. & Dillane, A. eds. (2018 forthcoming) Atrocity Exhibition: Critical Essays on Joy Division. London: Rowman and Littlefield.
  • Haynes, A., Power, M., Devereux, E., Dillane, A., and Carr, J., eds (2016) Public and Political Discources of Migration: International Perspectives, London: Rowman and Littlefield International. ISBN:978178348273  .
  • Devereux, E., Dillane, A., Power, M. (2015) David Bowie: Critical Perspectives, New York: Routledge.  ISBN:0415745721.
  • Devereux, E., Dillane, A. and Power, M. (2011) Morrissey: Fandom, Representation and Identities, Bristol: Intellect Books. ISBN: 9781841505961.

Published Book Chapters

  • Dillane, A., Power, M. and Devereux. (2017). ‘“Shame Makes the World Go Around”: Performed and Embodies (Gendered) Class Disgust in Morrissey’s “Slum Mums”’ in Music as Multi-Modal Discourse: Music, Power, and Protest, L. Way and S. McKerrell (eds), London: Bloomsbury
  • Dillane, A. (2016)  ‘Irish Traditional Music Dissemination at the End of the Long Nineteenth Century: Francis O’Neill’s Music of Ireland (1903) and the City of Chicago’ in Knowledge Dissemination in the Long Nineteenth Century, M. Dossena and S. Rosso (eds), Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars.
  • Dillane, A., Power, M., Haynes, A., Devereux, E, & Carr, J. (2016) ‘In the Frame? Discourses of Migration: An Introduction to the Volume’ in Haynes, A., Power, M., Devereux, E, Dillane, A. & Carr, J. (eds) Public and Political Discources of Migration: International Perspectives, London: Rowman and Littlefield International.
  • Dillane, A., Power, M., Haynes, A., Devereux, E, & Carr, J. (2016) ‘In the Frame? Discourses of Migration: An Introduction to the Volume’ in Haynes, A., Power, M., Devereux, E, Dillane, A. & Carr, J. (eds) Public and Political Discources of Migration: International Perspectives, London: Rowman and Littlefield International.
  • Devereux, E., Dillane, A., Power, M., Haynes, A. & Carr, J. (2016 Forthcoming) ‘Opportunities for Resistance Through Discourse’ in Haynes, A., Power, M., Devereux, E, Dillane, A. & Carr, J. (eds) Public and Political Discources of Migration: International Perspectives, London: Rowman and Littlefield International.
  • Devereux, E., Dillane, A. and Power, M. (2015) ‘Where are we now? Contemporary Scholarship on David Bowie’, in Devereux, E, Dillane, A. & Power, M. (ed.s) David Bowie: Critical Perspectives, New York: Routledge.
  • Dillane, A., Devereux, E. and Power, M. (2015) ‘Culminating Sounds and (En)visions: A critical reading of Bowie’s “Ashes to Ashes”’, in Devereux, E, Dillane, A. & Power, M. (ed.s) David Bowie: Critical Perspectives, New York: Routledge, 33-55.
  • Dillane, A. (2014) ‘Irish Traditional Music, Nostalgia, and Cultural Intimacy’. 25th Annual Sean O Riada Memorial Lecture. Traditional Music Society, University College Cork.
  • Dillane, A. and  Devereux, E. (2011) ‘Speedway for Beginners: Morrissey, Martyrdom and Ambiguity’ in Morrissey: Fandom, Representations, Identities: Bristol: Intellect Press/University of Chicago Press, 189-206.
  • Devereux, E., Dillane, A. and Power, M. (2011) ‘And Don’t Forget The Songs That Made You Sad and The Songs That Saved Your Life…’, in Devereux, E., Dillane, A. and Power, M. (eds.) Morrissey: Fandom, Representation and Identities, Bristol: Intellect Books, 13-18.

Forth-coming book chapters

  • Dillane, A. & Gareiss, N.  ‘The Lion, The Witch and The Closet’: Heteronormative Institutional Research and Performance Practices and the queering of ‘Traditions’, in Queering the Field: Sounding Out Ethnomusicology, G. Barz and W. Cheng (eds), Oxford University Press
  • Dillane, A. & Langlois, T. ‘Sonic Mapping and Critical Citizenship: Reflections on Limerick Soundscapes’ in Transforming Ethnomusicology – Social Activism and Applied Research, ed. B. Diamond and S. El Castelo-Branco. Oxford: Oxford University Press

Peer-reviewed Journal Articles

  • Power. M, and Dillane, A. (2018 forthcoming) ‘Sing to the Colonies: Music, Race and New Irish Cosmopolitanism in a Damian Dempsey Protest Song.’ in Power, M. & Dillane, A. (guest editors) MUSICultures (Journal of the Canadian Society for Traditional Music) Special Edition on Songs of Social Protest. 
  • Dillane, A. (2017) ‘Sacred and Profane: Expressions of Melbournian-Irishness in the Song Repertoire of Miss Cecilia Curtin, ethnic entrepreneur (1903-1937).  The Australasian Journal of Irish Studies
  • Dillane, A., Power, M., and Devereux, E. (2017) ‘‘Locating Culture, Making Soundscapes, and Activating Critical Social Relations: A Case Study from LimerickSoundscapes’, Portuguese Journal of Social Science.
  • Dillane, A., and Noone, M. (2016) ‘Irish Music Orientalism’ in New Hibernia Review, 20(1), Spring 2016, 121-137.
  • Power, M., Dillane, A. and Devereux, E. (2016 forthcoming in hard copy; 2015 in digital copy) ‘”I Sing Out to the Youth of the Slums.” Morrissey and Class Disgust’, Popular Music and Society. DOI:10.1080/03007766.2015.1072871.
  • Dillane, A., Langlois, T., Power, M. and Ní Bhriain, O. (2015) ‘Urban Soundscapes and Critical Citizenship: Explorations in activating a ‘sonic turn’ in urban cultural studies’. Journal of Urban Cultural Studies, 2(2), 89-106.
  • Dillane, A., Langlois, T. (2015) ‘Our Sounds, Our City: Urban Soundscapes, Critical Citizenship and the LimerickSoundscapes Project’. Journal of Urban Cultural Studies, 2(2), 135-150.
  • Dillane, A., Power, M. and Devereux, E. (2014) ‘I Can Have Both: A Queer Reading of Morrissey’. European journal of Popular Culture, 5 (2), 149-164.
  • Dillane, A. (2013) ‘Composing Identity, Fiddling with (Post)Ethnicity: Liz Carroll’s “Lake Effect”’.  MUSICultures (Canadian Society for Traditional Music), Vol 40 (1), 7-34.
  • Dillane, A. (2013) ‘Irish Nostalgic Song and the Performance of Identity’. Béaloideas Journal of the Folklore Society of Ireland, Vol 81, ed. Rionach Uí Ogáin. Dublin:  An Cumann le Béaloideas Éireann, 19-36.
  • Power, M., Dillane, A. and Devereux, E. (2012) ‘A push and a shove and the land is ours: Morrissey’s counter-hegemonic stance(s) on social class’, Critical Discourse Studies. 9(4), 375-392.
  • Dillane, A.  (2013) ‘Jim O’Donoghue – performer’ [annotated audio track]. ICTM Ireland Fieldwork CD. Dublin: International Council For Traditional Music Ireland.
  • Dillane, A. (2012) ‘Jim Across the Road’. New Hibernia Review, 16 (1) Spring 2012, 9-15.

Journal Special Edition guest editorship

  • Power, M. and Dillane, A. (2018 forthcoming) ‘Singers and Songs of Social Protest’, special edition of MUSICultures, Canadian Journal of Traditional Music.
  • Dillane, A. et al.  (2015) Journal of Urban Cultural Studies 2(1 & 2) special section/edition.
Encyclopaedia Entries
  • Dillane, A (2018 forthcoming) ‘Ireland: History, Culture and Geography of Music’, SAGE Encyclopaedia of Music and Culture, J. Sturman (ed). New York: Sage.
  • Dillane, A (2018 forthcoming) ‘Ireland: Modern and Contemporary Performance Practice’, SAGE Encyclopaedia of Music and Culture, J. Sturman (ed). New York: Sage.
  • Dillane, A. (2011) The Piano’ in The Companion to Irish Traditional Music. 2nd edition, ed. Fintan Vallely. Cork: Cork University Press.

Published Peer-reviewed Conference Proceedings

  • Dillane, A., Langlois, T., and Fernstrom, M. (2013). ‘Soundscapes and Critical Citizenship: Towards a People’s Soundscape’ in  Proceedings from the University of Kent Symposium on Acoustic Ecology (digital format).
  • Dillane, A. (2013) ‘Ethnomusicological Theory and Practice: Towards an Irish Ethnomusicology.’ Proceedings of the Crossroads Conference: Education and Traditional Music. Ed. Fintan Vallely et al.  Dublin: Whinstone.

Peer-reviewed Journal Reviews

  • Dillane, A. (forthcoming, 2018) Review of Gerry Smith’s Music and Identity: Celtic Tiger Blues (2017), in Popular Music.
  • Dillane, A. (2018) Review of A Different Kind of Ethnography: Imaginative Practices and Creative Methodologies (2017), ed. Elliott, D. and Culhane, D., in Bealoideas: Journal of Irish Folklore.
  • Dillane, A. (2016) Review of Music and Identity in Ireland and Beyond (2014), ed. Fitzgerald, M and O’Flynn, J., in Bealoideas: Journal of Irish Folklore, Summer/Autumn, 2016.
  • Dillane, A. (2014) Review of ‘Sonar-Cities: Learning Culture Through City Soundscapes’. World of Music, 3 (1).
  • Dillane, A. (2013) Review of ‘Sean Williams and Lillis Ó Laoire, Bright Star of the West: Joe Heaney, Irish song-man’. Ethnomusicology, vol 57(2), Fall 2013, 542-546.
  • Dillane, A. (2011) Review of ‘Irish Pirate Ballads and Other Songs of the Sea’ Smithsonian Folkways SFW CD 40552 (2009). Yearbook of Traditional Music Journal of the International Council of Traditional Musics.

PRESENTATIONS:

INVITED PRESENTATIONS (21) (not including 30 peer-reviewed national and international conference presentations since 2004)

2017 

  • Seminar speaker: ‘Singing Protest in a Globalised World: Dublin’s Damien Dempsey – A Case Study’ Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies seminar series, University of Notre Dame (Oct)
  • Symposium Speaker: ‘Nótaí/Notes: Music and Ireland’, Éire/Ireland Symposium, Boston College, Mass, USA (Sept).
  • Symposium Speaker: ‘Structures of Feeling in Contemporary Irish Song: Old Themes, New Voices’ in ‘Music for Words, Perhaps: A Symposium on Irish Song’, Princeton University, NJ., USA. (Mar). 
  • Public Lecture: ‘Irish Nostalgic Songs: Roots and Routes’. Bridgewater State University, Mass, USA. (Mar).

2016 

  • Roundtable speaker: ‘Reflections on the role of ethnomusicology in the study of traditional music on the BA in Irish Music and Dance, Irish World Academy, UL’.  Roundtable: ‘Once Again on Theory and Practice: The Contributions of Ethnomusicology and Ethnochoreology to Vernacular Music and Dance Programmes in Higher Education’.  International Council for Tradition Music Symposium and international board pre-biannual conference visit. University of Limerick (June).
  • Plenary speaker. ‘Applied Ethnomusicology and collaborations with the Social Sciences and Medical Sciences’ for ‘Music Research in Ireland Now and Into the Future, at The Society for Musicology in Ireland Annual Conference, Dublin City University (June).
  • Keynote: ‘Songs of Social Protest’, National Postgraduate Conference on Music and Social Protest, University of Groningen, The Netherlands (May).
  • Workshop speaker: ‘Francis O’Neill’s music cylinders and the World(ing) of Irish Music’, Mellon-funded Humanities without Borders The Global Midwest ‘Early History of World Music Recordings Project’, Franke Institute, University of Chicago (May).
  • Seminar: ‘LimerickSoundscapes and Critical Citizenship,’ Sociology Seminar Series, University of Limerick (Apr)
  • Annual Lecture: ‘Sacred and Profane: Irish Identity in the Song Repertoire of Miss Cecilia Curtin, Ethnic Entrepreneur, c. 1903-1937’. O’Donnell Research Fellowship Lecture, Newman College, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia (Feb).

2015 

  • Seminar: ‘Against the Grain: Counter-Hegemonic Songs of an Irish Singer-Songwriter (Damian Dempsey: A Case Study). National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland (Nov).
  • Conference: ‘Urban Soundscape (re)Generation as Utopian Method: LimerickSoundscapes (A Case Study)’, In the Regions of Utopia, Leverhulme-funded ‘Network of the Futures’ Symposium, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK. (July).

2013 

  • Seminar: ‘Soundscapes and Critical Citizenship – Towards a People’s Soundscape’, Dept. of Music, Southampton University, UK. (Oct).
  • Seminar: ‘Irish Music, Ethnicity, and Identity’, Global Irish Studies Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia  (Apr).
  • Seminar: ‘Composing Identity, Playing with (Post)Ethnicity: Liz Carroll’s Lake Effect. Sir Zelman Cowen School of Music Research Seminar, Monash University, Australia (Mar).
  • Seminar: ‘Irish Music, Performativity, and Cultural Intimacy’. Melbourne Conservatorium of Music Research Seminar, University of Melbourne, Australia (Mar).
  • Annual Lecture: ‘Aislings and Avatars: Irish (Traditional) Music, Performativity, and Cultural Intimacy’. Sean Ó Riada Annual Memorial Lecture, National University of Ireland, Cork, Ireland. (Jan).

2012

  • Seminar: ‘Music, Space, Utopia’. SAUL Senior Research Seminar, School of Architecture, University of Limerick (Nov).
  •  Seminar: ‘Sentimentalism in Irish Music’, Music in Ireland Lecture Series, School of Music, University College Dublin, Ireland (Oct).
  • Special Research Group: ‘Irish (Traditional) Music, Nostalgia, and Cultural Intimacy’.  Banchnoic Éireann Ó!: Folklore, Music and Song of Ireland Symposium, Princess Grace Library, Monaco (Sept).
  • Conference: ‘Irish Nostalgia’.  ‘What is Different About the Irish?’ Irish Studies Interdisciplinary Conference, Dept of Sociology, University College Dublin, Ireland (Sept)

 

Seminar Presentations@UL

2014

  •  ‘Keep It Country: Country Music and the Twentieth Century  (Perspectives from Ireland and Australia’, A Tower Seminar, Irish World Academy, University of Limerick (Sept). Featured Speaker and Seminar Convener.

2012

  •  ‘Textures of Place in Music: Phenomenology, Biography & Spatial Stories’, Music Place, Self, A Tower Seminar, Irish World Academy, University of Limerick (Nov). Featured Speaker and Seminar Convener.
  • ‘Conversations and Play’ Performance, Text, Context Interdisciplinary Group, A Tower Seminar, Irish World Academy, University of Limerick, (Feb). Featured Speaker and Seminar Co-convener.
  •  ‘Texting the City: Francis O’Neill’s Irish Music and Chicago’s Modernity’.  Tower Seminar Series Interdisciplinary Group ‘Performance, Text, Context’, Irish World Academy, University of Limerick (Feb). Featured Speaker and Seminar Co-convener.
critical-irish-music

Critical Irish Music Studies

Irish Music Studies has a long and venerable tradition in Ireland.  What I term ‘Critical Irish Music Studies’ is a way of approaching the study of  Irish (traditional) music (its production/reception, historiography, political economy, aesthetics, identity politics, etc) using critical and cultural theory to prise apart the discourse (and its relationship to practice) and to explore different ways of conceiving and thinking about/performing Irish Music. For more on the MA in Irish Music Studies, click here.

Recent publications include an article in the 2017  Australasian Journal of Irish Studies on the little-known 20th century vocal pedagogue and ethnic entrepreneur, Cecilia Curtin, who frequently performed at events patronized by Archbishop Daniel Mannix (originally from Charleville and famous for his long episcopacy in Melbourne). The research was supported by the 2016 O’Donnell Research Fellowship in Irish Studies at the O’Donnell Library,  Newman College, University of Melbourne.

Currently I’m writing about the staging and performance of Irish music in Chicago from diasporic, ethnic, civic and contemporary global perspectives.

ethnomusicology

Ethnomusicology

I teach ethnomusicology  at the Irish World Academy.  At the undergrad level, students learn the basics and how to do fieldwork ethically.  At MA level, we study the history of the discipline, key concepts, fieldwork methods and ethnography, contemporary theoretical issues, and world, popular, and vernacular musics.  There are plenty of practical components too, from weekly music ensemble to solo instrumental/vocal tuition in Irish/celtic musics.  Final projects are either full dissertations or half dissertation half performance or ethnographic film, etc. You can read more about the programme here.

If you want to hear  a little more about my work in ethnomusicology, I did a short podcast for the Irish Humanities Alliance which can be found here.

In Sept 2015 my colleague Colin Quigley and I  hosted the first ever joint forum between two of the largest ethnomusicological societies – SEM (Society for Ethnomusicology) and ICTM (International Council for Traditional Music), as well as the 31st Annual ESEM (European Seminar in Ethnomusicology) conference. In July 2015, the Irish World Academy hosted the Bi-Annual ICTM World Conference.

critical-irish-music

Critical Irish Music Studies

 Irish Music Studies has a long and venerable tradition in Ireland.  What I term ‘Critical Irish Music Studies’ is a way of approaching the study of  Irish (traditional) music (its production/reception, historiography, political economy, aesthetics, identity politics, etc) using critical and cultural theory to prise apart the discourse (and its relationship to practice) and to explore different ways of conceiving and thinking about/performing Irish Music. For more on the MA in Irish Music Studies, click here.

Recent publications include an article in the 2017  Australasian Journal of Irish Studies on the little-known 20th century vocal pedagogue and ethnic entrepreneur, Cecilia Curtin, who frequently performed at events patronized by Archbishop Daniel Mannix (originally from Charleville and famous for his long episcopacy in Melbourne). The research was supported by the 2016 O’Donnell Research Fellowship in Irish Studies at the O’Donnell Library,  Newman College, University of Melbourne.

Currently I’m writing about the staging and performance of Irish music in Chicago from diasporic, ethnic, civic and contemporary global perspectives.

 

music-society

Music, Culture, Society

I’m part of the Popular Music and Popular Culture Research Cluster @ UL,  an interdisciplinary research group working on a variety of popular music and culture projects. Along with with my two PMPC colleagues Eoin Devereux and Martin Power, we are currently developing a new project  ’Musically Mapping Limerick’ or L-Pop for short. As well as documenting and curating memorabilia and interviewing musicians, fans, venue owners, promoters, etc, about the local music scene past and present in the city, we are also going to track national and international solo/band visits to Limerick and find ways to mark all of these sites across the cityscape, physically and virtually.  We intend to create a map that could be used by tourists and locals alike, and eventually, find a dedicated, interactive space where the rich music heritage of Limerick now and into the future may be celebrated on a permanent basis.

We’ve staged events and published Morrissey, Riot Grrl, and Bowie (dealing with fandom, counter-hegemonic stances on class and gender issues, and performance, embodiment and critical, creative processes). Our most recent book publication is (2015 and 2016): David Bowie: Critical Perspectives with Routledge.  We’ve a couple of more books on the way, including Songs of Social Protest and one on Joy Division.

Previous events held include:

  • 2015 Atrocity Exhibition: A Symposium on Joy Division, Popular Music, Popular Culture Research Cluster @ UL. University of Limerick, 25th- 26th Nov.
  • 2015 Songs of Social Protest, Popular Music, Popular Culture Research Cluster @ UL and Power Discourse and Society Research Cluster @ UL, University of Limerick, 28th Apr- 1st May
  • 2013 – Riot Grrrl. A One-Day Symposium on Women and Rock, with the Dept. of Sociology, University of Limerick. Apr 16th.
  • 2012 – David Bowie: A Three-Day Symposium on David Bowie, with the Dept. of Sociology, University of Limerick, Oct 26th-28th.
  • 2011 – Morrissey: Fandom, Representations, Identities. Special Event and Book Launch, UL. 20th Sept. With UK Launch. Manchester, Oct 7th.
  • 2009 – The Songs that Saved your Life Again: A Two-Day Symposium on Morrissey, with the Dept. of Sociology, University of Limerick, Apr 24th-25th.

I’m also part of a research cluster in University of Limerick called Power, Discourse and Society @ UL.  We’ve an associated book series  and a 2016 publication, following on from our 2014 conference ‘In the Frame: Public and Political Discourses of Migration’  

Read more…

Dolly

The Differences

Sometimes in the amazing ignorance I hear things and see things
I never knew I saw and heard before
Sometimes in the ignorance
I feel the meaning
Invincible invisible wisdom,
And I commune with intuitive instinct
With the force that made life be
And since it made life be
It is greater than life
And since it let extinction be
It is greater than extinction.
I commune with feelings more than
prayer
For there is nothing else to ask for
That companionship is
And it is superior to any other is.
Sometimes in my amazing ignorance
Others see me only as they care to see
I am to them as they think
According the standard I should not be
And that is the difference between I and them
Because I see them as they are to is
And not the seeming isness of the was.

Sun Ra

Irish Traditional Music in a Modern World